Committed to equity and social justice, Miguel Suero is an emerging leader in public service dedicated to accessibility in higher education, diversity in non-profit leadership, and the advancement of literracy, cultural, and artistic initiatives that engage local communities in need. As Project Coordinator for Education Abroad at the City University of New York's Hunter College, Mr. Suero has assisted in the development and management of Study Abroad and International Exchange programs that connect typically underserved students with opportunities to develop global competencies through immersive academic experiences abroad.

In this capacity he has served as an ardent administrator engaged in the daily operations and finance management of international affairs for the college. Over the course of five years his responsibilities have ranged from academic advisement to analysis and implementation of university-wide policies, as well as accounts management and support to private and congressionally funded scholarships for international  higher education.

Mr. Suero joins the National Urban Fellows having earned a Master of Arts in Theatre from CUNY's Hunter College. The graduate program nurtured his passions for and developed his commitment to the performing arts and public service in large urban centers. Later, this experience gave way to an important career in international higher education administration and national diplomacy for education, arts, and culture.

Miguel Suero is excited to experience the rigor and discipline built into the curriculum for the National Urban Fellows' Master of Public Administration. He welcomes the challenges ahead, and looks forward to a mentorship placement with a distinguished public servant charged with developing sustainable strategies for public access to education, fine arts, and sophisticated cultural programs in their city. Miguel considers the fellowship "will undoubtedly enhance my leadership skills and develop aptitudes in public policy decision-making necessary to directly impact inner-city communities across the United States."